Microsoft erklärt uns Leet-Speak


Th1$ 1$ \/\/h4+ \/\/3 4ll h@v3 \/\/@1+3d ph0r! M1cr0$0ph7 $h0\/\/$ u$ \/\/h4+ 1+$ @ll @b0u+ +h3 l337 $p34|<


Boah wie geil! 😉 Microsoft zeigt uns wie Leet-Speak funktioniert…


Key points for learning leetspeek



  • Numbers are often used as letters. The term “leet” could be written as “1337,” with “1” replacing the letter L, “3” posing as a backwards letter E, and “7” resembling the letter T. “0” (zero) will typically replace the letter “O.”

  • Characters of similar appearance can be used to replace the letters they resemble. For example, “5” or even “$” can replace the letter S. Applying this style, the word “leetspeek” can be written as “133t5p33k” or even “!337$p34k,” with “4” replacing the letter A.

  • Letters can be substituted for other letters that may sound alike. Using “Z” for a final letter S, and “X” for words ending in the letters C or K is common. For example, leetspeekers might refer to their computer “5x1llz” (skills).

  • Rules of grammar are rarely obeyed. Some leetspeekers will capitalize every letter except for vowels (LiKe THiS) and otherwise reject conventional English style and grammar.

  • Mistakes are often uncorrected. Common typing misspellings (or typos) such as “teh” instead of “the” are left uncorrected and may be adopted to replace the correct spelling.

  • Non-alphanumeric characters may be combined to form letters. For example, using slashes to create “/\/\” can substitute for the letter M, and two pipes combined with a hyphen to form “|-|” is often used in place of the letter H. Thus, the word “ham” could be written as “|-|4/\/\.””

Quelle: http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/children/kidtalk.mspx

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