japanese puns?

Learning a new language is full of discoveries along the way!

As I am spending more time on learning the Japanese language the more different things seem to unlock. One of those things is the apparent fun Japanese companies have with puns/slight writing mismatches.

Like this one – I think (as I can not be 100% sure yet…learning!):

こわはたんの活わだ?or これはたんの活わだ?or こわはたんの汚わだ? or これはたんの汚わだ?

This is an advertisement in a supermarket for a laundry detergent. It is themed to an Anime called “Attack on Titan” – properly because the detergents name is Attack. So when I tried to make sense of the text I first read it wrong, of course.

Let’s look at it step-by-step:

I first started reading the Hiragana portion and make sense of it. There I made my first mistake which is to misread the first second character. For some reason my brain went for (wa) when I should have gone for (re).

Then I typed away further and came to the Kanji. I read a (katsu) when it in fact was a (kitanai).

Given that you’ve typed those into Google Translate you will get very interesting results. I had a good laugh by then:

I am not sure if this is on purpose or not – as I do not yet know if I am just making a mess on this or if this is intentionally done so that, given your level of Japanese reading and attention-spent reading it, you get very different and funny results.

Any Japanese readers that can add some explanations? Am I far off with the thoughts?

Digital assistant language teacher

Since a couple of months we are trying harder to learn a foreign language.

And as we excepted it is very hard to get a proper grasp on speaking the language. Especially since it is a very different language to our mother tongue.

And while comfortably interacting with digital assistants around the house every day in english and german the thought came up: why don’t these digital assistants help with foreign language listening and speaking training?

I mean Google Assistant answers questions in the language you have asked them. Siri and Alexa need to know upfront in which language you are going to ask questions. But at least Alexa can translate between languages…

But with all seriousness: Why do we not already have the obvious killer feature delivered? Everyone could already have a personal language training partner…

How to get me to actively avoid your products

It is a simple one step process: shove unasked advertising in my face. Bonus points for loud full blast audio right of the start.

If I ever see unasked advertising that tried to be sneaky or not do sneaky I am going to block it without noticing from whom or for what it was.

But when it’s shown so often and is so intrusive that I take note of your brand. That brand is not considered for future business anymore.

That is especially for services where I am the product paying with my data.

Sample 1
blocking
Sample 2

reward driven speed limits

As you might know I am living in Germany. Germany is the one country where you have some roads that are legally not having any speed limit whatsoever. If the circumstances allow to safely drive 250 km/h you are allowed to do so. It’s up to the drivers judgement.

Now as much as this is a great thing of personal freedom it also has some negative side effects on the climate.

Your car is burning a lot more fuel when driving those kind of speeds. And a lot meaning that it resembles more an exponential curve than a linear line. Rule of thumb: 2x the speed is more than 4x the consumption.

Ever once in a while people start discussing about a general speed limit for Germany – as every other country has it. Some talk about 160 km/h, some about 120 km/h.

The motivations are diverse: climate, resource use, safety, …

In any case additional limits would need to be enforced. More speed traps…

A.Savin (Wikimedia Commons · WikiPhotoSpace)

What if things would be handled differently?

How about this:

Politics would introduce a “best speed lottery”. On every street without a speed limit there would randomly be speed controls and speed traps. Those who follow the best practices of driving … Let’s say 120 km/h… Would be rewarded when randomly photographed. The reward would be a tax discount on car tax and/or gas tax and one ticket put into the countries lottery pool. Once a quarter a new electric car or similar would be given to a random winner.

What would you think would make people drive slower in their own motivation?

icon this blog

I’ve written about the progressive web application functionalities provided by this blog. But I’ve missed to explain in all simplicity what it means for most of you trying to read.

This is where Volker explains in simple terms what to do:

Step 1: Tap this icon in your browser:
(maybe someone can send me an android icon that does this?)

Step 2: Find and tap on “Add to Home Screen”
Step 3: give the icon a name

Enjoy the quick access to this blog.

Japan related YouTube channels I regularly watch

If you ask me for an estimate on the main sources of entertainment we use in our household I would say it’s easily 80% YouTube these days. Mainly we’re watching the content created by small independent content creators while working out or during dinner.

None of this consumption is through the YouTube website or any official clients (like the abomination pre-installed on the TV) but through a carefully handcrafted series of scripts that watch certain playlists and download everything appearing new there automatically to the house in best quality. This then can be watched at any time from any TV in the house.

The playlists that are being monitored are either those directly curated by the YouTube channels or a playlist that get’s filled directly by us from recommendations / social media links.

So here are some recommendations from our heavy-rotation list:

Some more “special ones” – Musashi-Kosugi Station is the station at my preferred home-base when in Tokyo. I like the more off-the-center vibe of Musashikosugi and this is the main station live cam there:

This would not be a complete list without this: Nippon Wandering TV is one of several channels that do one thing: walk or cycle through Japan and record it. Simple, eh? – This stuff is playing as “screensaver” on every screen in the house when not used to watch anything else:

blog maintenance – status

A bit of feedback is in on the plan to revitalize this blog. Thanks for that!

I have spent some more time this weekend on getting everything a bit tidied up.

There is the archive of >3.000 posts that I plan to review and re-categorize.

There is the big number of comments that had been made in the past and that I need to come up with a plan on how to allow/disallow/deal with comments and discussions in general on this website.

There is also the design and template aspects of this website. I switched to a different template and started to adjust it so that it shall make access to the stream of posts as easy as possible. Until then you need to wait or contact me through other means. But contacting is another post for another time.

resilvering …

The last Ubuntu kernel update seemingly kicked two hard disks out of a ZFS raidz – sigh. With ZFS on Linux this poses an issue:

Two hard drives that previously where in this ZFS pool named “storagepool” where reassigned a completely different device-id by Linux. So /dev/sdd became /dev/sdf and so on.

ZFS uses a specific metadata structure to encode information about that hard drive and it’s relationship to storage pools. When Linux reassigned a name to the hard drive apparently some things got shaken up in ZFS’ internal structures and mappings.

The solution was these steps

  • export the ZFS storage pool (=taking it offline for access/turning it off)
  • use the zpool functionality “labelclear” to clear off the data partition table of the hard drives that got “unavailable” to the storage pool
  • import the ZFS storage pool back in (=taking it online for access)
  • using the replace functionality of zpool to replace the old drive name with the new drive name.

After poking around for about 2 hours the above strategy made the storage pool to start rebuilding (resilvering in ZFS speak). Well – learning something every day.

4+ hours to go.

Bonus: I was not immediately informed of the DEGRADED state of the storage pool. That needs to change. A simple command now is run by cron-tab every hour.

zpool status -x | grep state: | tr –delete state: |mosquitto_pub -t house/stappenbach/server/poppyseeds/zpool -l

This pushes the ZFS storage pool state to MQTT and get’s worked on by a small NodeRed flow.